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Subject details

  • Topics
    • Introduction
    • What is History and Does it Matter?
    • Historical Literacy: Asking Questions
    • Historical Literacy: Critical Thinking
    • Historical Literacy: Historical Imagination
    • History Today?
    • Q&A with Modern History Alumni
    • History and Policy
    • History in the Media
  • Study resources
    • Instructional Methods
      • Disscusion forum/Discussion Board
      • Online assignment submission
      • Standard Media
    • Online Materials
      • Resources and Links

In this subject students will:

1. Reflect on discipline specific skills and graduate capabilities and their potential application in their careers

2. Synthesise and integrate knowledge from multiple topic areas

3. Extend their analytical and critical thinking

4. Build and consolidate communication skills (written, oral, interpersonal)

5. Understand what historical literacy is

6. Work independently and collaboratively on solving problems

  • Assignment 1 - Reflective Exercise (10%)
  • Assignment 2 - Debate (50%)
  • Assignment 3 - Briefing Paper or Lesson Plan (30%)
  • Assignment 4 - Active Collaboration (10%)

Textbooks are subject to change within the academic year. Students are advised to purchase their books no earlier than one to two months before the start of a subject

Entry Requirements

Equivalent Subjects

You cannot enrol in this unit if you have successfully completed any of the following subject(s) because they are considered academically equivalent:

  • MAQ-HST380

Special requirements

No special requirements

This subject was previously known as MHIX300 Making History: Capstone Subject.

 
 
The capstone subject is the pinnacle of a major in Modern History. It brings together the knowledge, skills and capabilities students gain across the program and helps prepare them for the next stage of their careers. What does a Modern history graduate bring to the workplace? How can the skills gained be transferred? How do students/graduates define themselves in a work sense? How has the major fitted them for future employment? With these questions in mind students undertake activities, collaboratively and individually, to reflect on their historical literacy and where it can take them. 

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