Warning! This unit contains mature content and may not be suitable for some students. Any student under the age of 16 who would like to enrol in this unit must first complete a Parental Consent Form.

Subject details

  • Topics
    • Introduction
    • The making of the intimate sphere
    • Remaking of the intimate sphere 1: detraditionalisation & individualisation
    • Remaking of the intimate sphere: authenticity & expert knowledge
    • Passionate love in history
    • Love as art, love as religion
    • A brief history of friendship
    • Contemporary friendships
    • The family in history & contemporary society
    • Childhood: history & present dilemmas
    • Parents, children & the transformation of intimacy
    • The dark side of intimacy
    • Review: reflections on intimacy, love, friendship & family
  • Study resources
    • Instructional Methods
      • Disscusion forum/Discussion Board
      • Online Quizzes/Tests
      • Online assignment submission
      • Standard Media
    • Online Materials
      • Resources and Links

At the completion of this subject students will:

  1. have obtained a broad knowledge of classical and contemporary literature in the sociology of intimacy
  2. have developed skills in interpretive reading and critical thinking as well as an improved competence in essay writing.
  • Assignment 1 - Assignment 1 (20%)
  • Assignment 2 - Assignment 2 (20%)
  • Assignment 3 - Assignment 3 (40%)
  • Assignment 4 - Online Discussion (20%)

Textbooks are subject to change within the academic year. Students are advised to purchase their books no earlier than one to two months before the start of a subject

Entry Requirements

Equivalent Subjects

You cannot enrol in this unit if you have successfully completed any of the following subject(s) because they are considered academically equivalent:

  • MAQ-SGY360

Special requirements

No special requirements

This subject was previously known as SOCX315 The Intimate Sphere: Love, Friendship and Family.

Warning: SOCX315 Love, Sex and Friendship looks at the dark side of intimacy including 'various forms of violence, abuse and neglect'. Students are asked to discuss, with their class online, their life experiences.

Our relations with intimate others are governed by a quite distinctive set of norms. We do not normally think it is appropriate to adopt the strategic attitude of the actor in commercial settings, nor do we adopt the impartial disinterest of the actor in public life.

How did the intimate sphere become carved out as a specific domain in modern social life and what has been said about the distinctiveness of its governing expectations?

This subject examines a range of accounts of special love, friendship and familial relations. In addition, what are the present realities that confront these relations?

It is anticipated that students will obtain a broad knowledge of classical and contemporary literature in the sociology of intimacy.

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