Subject details

  • Topics
    • What is sociology?
    • History of sociology and key ideas
    • What is a social fact?
    • Australian families
    • Gender, language and domination
    • The life course - growing up in the 21st century
    • Religion and social change
    • Media, race and ethnicity
    • Class and inequality
    • Work, employment and society
    • Crime and society
    • Globalisation: the world as social context
  • Study resources
    • Instructional Methods
      • Disscusion forum/Discussion Board
      • Online assignment submission
      • Standard Media
    • Online Materials
      • Resources and Links

At the completion of this subject students will:

  1. be familiar with the key sociological concepts as they are applied to the study of Australian society
  2. be aware of existing patterns of social structure and the processes and nature of change currently taking place
  3. have developed a broad understanding of the nature and methods of social science
  4. be able to use basic social research skills to undertake some types of original, primary research under supervision
  • Assignment 1 - Assignment 1 (20%)
  • Assignment 2 - Assignment 2 (25%)
  • Assignment 3 - Assignment 3 (35%)
  • Assignment 4 - Online Discussion (20%)

Textbooks are subject to change within the academic year. Students are advised to purchase their books no earlier than one to two months before the start of a subject

Entry Requirements

Equivalent Subjects

You cannot enrol in this unit if you have successfully completed any of the following subject(s) because they are considered academically equivalent:

  • MAQ-SGY110

You are recommended to have completed the following subjects(s) or have equivalent knowledge before starting this unit:

Special requirements

No special requirements

This subject was previously known as SGY110 Australian and Global Societies.

Commence your studies of society by learning about the sociological framework and establish skills for life. You will be introduced to many of the ways in which sociologists think about the most intimate aspects of life - such as sexuality, the family and gender - as well as to larger and often impersonal structural features, such as social class, the labour market and social policy. You will also have the opportunity to use social research techniques such as interviews and observation in the real world, as well as to uncover the secrets often hidden in other sources of information and data.

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